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Computer Science Bibliographies

Bibliography for Nelson H. F. Beebe

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Number of references:1092Last update:November 17, 2007
Number of online publications:619Supported:Unknown
Most recent reference:2007 Info:Version 1.17"m

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Information on the Bibliography

Author:
Nelson H. F. Beebe <beebe at math . utah . edu, beebe at acm . org, beebe at computer . org> (email mangled to prevent spamming)
University of Utah
Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
155 S 1400 E RM 233
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
USA
Abstract:
This bibliography records books and papers by Albert Einstein (14 March 1879–18 April 1955).
Keywords:
Albert Einstein; BibTeX; bibliography
Author Comments:
This bibliography has four main sections:
* Einstein's personal works, and publications by others about them.
* Publications related to the development and use of atomic bombs and other technologies in World War II.
* Textbooks on cosmology for the physics community.
* Additional books that describe cosmology for readers outside the physics community.
At version 1.17, the year coverage looked like this:
1901 ( 1) 1937 ( 1) 1973 ( 6) 1902 ( 2) 1938 ( 7) 1974 ( 6) 1903 ( 1) 1939 ( 3) 1975 ( 2) 1904 ( 1) 1940 ( 3) 1976 ( 7) 1905 ( 5) 1941 ( 3) 1977 ( 5) 1906 ( 5) 1942 ( 1) 1978 ( 7) 1907 ( 8) 1943 ( 1) 1979 ( 24) 1908 ( 5) 1944 ( 3) 1980 ( 9) 1909 ( 5) 1945 ( 7) 1981 ( 7) 1910 ( 7) 1946 ( 7) 1982 ( 16) 1911 ( 8) 1947 ( 5) 1983 ( 10) 1912 ( 10) 1948 ( 7) 1984 ( 9) 1913 ( 10) 1949 ( 11) 1985 ( 11) 1914 ( 15) 1950 ( 15) 1986 ( 13) 1915 ( 12) 1951 ( 6) 1987 ( 14) 1916 ( 19) 1952 ( 6) 1988 ( 12) 1917 ( 10) 1953 ( 11) 1989 ( 11) 1918 ( 13) 1954 ( 8) 1990 ( 11) 1919 ( 14) 1955 ( 11) 1991 ( 9) 1920 ( 19) 1956 ( 10) 1992 ( 16) 1921 ( 21) 1957 ( 4) 1993 ( 19) 1922 ( 23) 1958 ( 2) 1994 ( 17) 1923 ( 14) 1959 ( 3) 1995 ( 20) 1924 ( 12) 1960 ( 4) 1996 ( 19) 1925 ( 10) 1961 ( 7) 1997 ( 20) 1926 ( 3) 1962 ( 4) 1998 ( 16) 1927 ( 8) 1963 ( 2) 1999 ( 18) 1928 ( 6) 1964 ( 12) 2000 ( 25) 1929 ( 7) 1965 ( 10) 2001 ( 17) 1930 ( 8) 1966 ( 5) 2002 ( 35) 1931 ( 7) 1967 ( 9) 2003 ( 19) 1932 ( 3) 1968 ( 7) 2004 ( 29) 1933 ( 5) 1969 ( 6) 2005 ( 60) 1934 ( 5) 1970 ( 8) 2006 ( 34) 1935 ( 4) 1971 ( 3) 2007 ( 9) 1936 ( 5) 1972 ( 7)
Article: 324 Book: 694 InCollection: 29 InProceedings: 11 MastersThesis: 1 Misc: 6 PhdThesis: 2 Proceedings: 22 TechReport: 3
Total entries: 1092
This bibliography includes selected publications about Einstein in recognition of the centennial year of his famous 1905 papers, one of which (on the Photoelectric Effect) led to his award in 1921 of the Nobel Prize in Physics: see
http://nobelprize.org/physics/laureates/1921/
and also
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Einstein
for an accessible on-line biography.
Two other 1905 papers on Brownian motion and Special Relativity are viewed by many scientists as also worthy of the Nobel Prize, but it took many decades for a conservative senior physics community to accept the Theory of Special Relativity.
The story of how Einstein got the Nobel Prize, and why it took so long, is well chronicled in a chapter of Pais' last book on Einstein [Pais:1994:ELH], and the remark in that bibliography entry carries additional information.
Pais was the last person to work with, and know well, both Albert Einstein and the great Danish physicist Niels Bohr (who, along with the German physicist Max Planck, is regarded as the grandfather of quantum physics), and his books contain valuable insights into these two men who were not only great scientists, but also great humanists, and inspirations for generations of younger scientists.
This bibliography was developed in support of a special course in the University of Utah Department of Physics, Physics 1905, initiated in August 2005 by my friends and colleagues, Ben Bromley and Maria Cranor, in recognition of the centennial of Einstein's Miraculous Year of 1905.
The goal of the Physics 1905 course is to describe for undergraduate students, most whom are from the humanities, what Albert Einstein did, why he is viewed as one of mankind's greatest scientists, and how his work changed the course of science, strongly affected Twentieth-Century history, ushered in the Nuclear Age and the Cold War, and led to a profoundly different understanding of the origin and evolution of the Universe. A New Yorker cartoon after his death in 1955 showed the Cosmos with Planet Earth carrying a sign ``Albert Einstein lived here''.
We hope that Physics 1905 will continue to be offered each Fall Term, because it is comparatively rare in university science education to reach out to nonscientists, and explain why science is important to everyone, and why we to find it so fascinating and worthy of career-long study.
Four phrases occur extensively in this bibliography, and deserve brief definitions;
* Principle of Relativity: It was first defined by Henri Poincaré in 1904 to mean that laws and physical phenomena must be the same for a ``fixed'' observer as for an observer who has a uniform motion of translation relative to him [Whittaker:1955:AE, p. 41]
* Special Theory of Relativity: a slight correction to Newton's Laws of Motion that incorporates velocity-dependent mass [Feynman:1997:SEP, pp. 49–50].
* Principle of Equivalence: the idea that when a thing is falling freely everything inside it seems weightless [Feynman:1997:SEP, pp. 129–130].
* General Theory of Relativity: This is Einstein's Theory of Gravitation, extending the Special Theory to handle the case of varying velocity (acceleration). It is based on a mathematically-complex description of the Universe as four space-time dimensions with curvature of space caused by objects of mass being responsible for what we usually call gravitation.
Whittaker's in memoriam paper for Albert Einstein [Whittaker:1955:AE] lists 197 of Einstein's publications; each is included in this bibliography, with a key Whittaker-number identifying the entry in Whittaker's list. That list is not complete, however; Schilpp [Schilpp:1949:AEPb] identifies 309 scientific publications and an additional 136 nonscientific ones up to 1949, plus numerous letters. Version 1.00 of this bibliography now has many of them, with all of those up to number 163 identified by Schilpp-number data, but it remains incomplete, and is still a work in progress. Schilpp-number data will be expanded in later editions of this bibliography.
In version 1.00 of this bibliography, of the 304 entries listed that are authored by Einstein before his death (there are many posthumous publications), 221 are in German, 145 in English, 22 in French, 4 in Italian, 2 in Russian, 2 in Spanish, 1 in Dutch, 1 in Hungarian, and 1 in Swedish. English translations are provided for all of the non-English titles, following the practice of the American Mathematical Society MathSciNet database. Cross references are supplied for multipart publications and for corrections and comments.
Of the 304 entries, 246 have Einstein as the sole author. Almost 30 distinct co-authors are listed, of whom Leopold Infeld appears 9 times, Walter Mayer 7 times, J. Laub 4 times, and about 20 (some of them also Nobel Prize winners) appear only once. Einstein never had any doctoral students, and rarely taught courses after he moved to Berlin at the age of 35.
Of the 304 entries, 47 were published in the journal Annalen der Physik, the leading physics journal in the world at the beginning of the Twentieth Century. After Einstein moved to Berlin in 1914, he published 49 papers in the meeting reports of the Prussian Academy of Science (three separate parts of Staendiger Beobachter der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften). After he moved to the USA in 1933, he published 14 papers in the journal Annals of Mathematics, which is edited at Princeton University, near the separate Princeton Institute for Advanced Study at which he spent the last two decades of his life. He published 14 in the German Natural Sciences (Naturwissenschaften), 10 papers in the German Physical Journal (Physikalische Zeitschrift), 7 in the Proceedings of the German Physical Society (Verhandlungen der Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft), 6 in the German Journal of Physics (Zeitschrift fuer Physik), and 5 or fewer in 77 other periodicals, of which 56 contain only a single Einstein publication.
Einstein's first paper in English was in 1927 [Curie:1927:EIB], although the first English translation of his German works appeared in 1916, and publications in English about his work began in 1912. His last book in German appeared in 1954, a year before his death.
At least two dozen editions of Einstein's short book ``The Meaning of Relativity'' have been published, and are recorded here.
An important source of material on Albert Einstein will be the Einstein Archives Online, jointly sponsored by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the California Institute of Technology, on the World-Wide Web at
http://www.alberteinstein.info/
The page at
http://www.alberteinstein.info/database/availability.html
notes:
``The present version of Einstein Archives Online presents digitized images for Einstein's handwritten manuscripts. In particular, it does not include correspondence, typescripts, publications, photos, or manuscripts by others. The present version of Einstein Archives Online presents transcriptions and/or translations only for those manuscripts that are already published in the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein.''
Another Web site devoted to Einstein is
http://www.aip.org/history/einstein/
Dozens of new books were published in recognition of the 2005 centennial of 1905. In addition, 1995 was the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II, and the expiration of the 50-year publication moratorium of the British Official Secrets Act. The latter made available historical material that has been incorporated in new books, notably Bernstein's careful chronicle [Bernstein:1996:HUC] of the Nazi effort to build an atomic bomb.
Data for this bibliography have been collected from
* the University of Utah Mathematics Department bibliography archives,
* the TeX User Group bibliography archives,
* the Karlsruhe Computer Science bibliography archives,
* the European Mathematical Society Zentralblatt fuer Mathematik database,
* the American Mathematical Society MathSciNet database,
* the JSTOR database, and
* several online library catalogs, including those of the British Library, the Karlsruhe Virtual Library catalog, the Oxford University Library, and the US Library of Congress.

Browsing the bibliography

Bibliographic Statistics

Types:
book(694), article(324), incollection(29), proceedings(22), inproceedings(11), misc(6), techreport(3), phdthesis(2), mastersthesis(1)
Fields:
year(1095), title(1092), bibdate(1086), acknowledgement(1081), pages(1074), author(970), address(764), publisher(760), lccn(639), isbn(512), isbn-13(511), subject(504), volume(434), language(332), journal(324), number(304), remark(267), note(231), whittaker-number(210), url(199), series(188), subject-dates(179), schilpp-number(174), issn(161), editor(145), author-dates(109), month(107), coden(89), edition(89), price(82), mrnumber(79), booktitle(74), mrclass(73), mrnumber-url(68), tableofcontents(48), mrreviewer(47), zmnumber(36), fjournal(30), zmreviewer(28), doi(26), doi-url(26), abstract(25), xxnote(24), day(20), keywords(17), meetingname(6), authordates(5), howpublished(5), type(5), classmath(4), institution(3), school(3), xxpages(3), xxbooktitle(2), xxisbn(2), xxjournal(2), abbrjournal(1), chapterheadings(1), dewey(1), libnote(1), review(1), subjectdates(1), summary(1), translator-dates(1), xpages(1), xxauthor(1), xxday(1), xxtitle(1)
Distribution of publication dates:
Distribution of publication dates

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